The big change

We will be one billion more people on earth by 2030 – trade and transports need to keep up. As cities grow, congestion, pollution and strains on the traffic system will increase. The transport industry will play a major role in tackling global challenges, and automation will be a key factor – including the use of autonomous vehicles. For Volvo Trucks, these developments are firmly human-centric.

 

Transportation is really the lifeblood, the pulse of societies, it drives prosperity for business and the people. In the near future, we will start to see self driving trucks from Volvo on our roads becoming a part of our society.

Sasko Cuklev

Director Autonomous Solutions, Volvo Trucks

Driving into the future

Automation will revolutionize the transport industry – it will improve productivity, lower fuel consumption, and optimize traffic management and route planning among other things. For drivers it will increase safety, improve conditions and in many cases introduce new ways of working. Automation is not about killing jobs – there will still be a need for skilled drivers in the future.

 

Automation comes in many forms and applications, from advanced driver support systems to self-driving trucks. We are putting huge effort into solutions that will make life easier for drivers and operators – making the job more attractive and safer.

Ann-Sofi Karlsson

Director Human Factors for Automation, Volvo Trucks

Meet the refuse truck that drives itself

There is a risk of accidents when refuse trucks reverse in housing areas. With a self-driving truck, only one driver is required. The truck reverses automatically, following the driver around houses collecting refuse. This research project with Swedish recycling company Renova helps to increase both productivity and safety.

Autonomous driving – under ground

Self-driving Volvo FMX trucks are being tested in regular operations at Boliden. The trucks contribute to increasing productivity and safety, as they can keep working directly after blasting is taking place. Normally a wait is required before work can commence. This is an example of full automation in a confined area, where no driver is needed.

Platooning: saving fuel by driving together

Using connectivity, trucks in a platoon or road-train can communicate with each other. Distance, speed and braking can all be controlled. The follower trucks use radar and camera and receive information from the trucks in front. Today, the average platoon can save up to 10 per cent of a truck’s fuel consumption. This figure will rise to 15 per cent in the coming decade, as trucks drive closer and closer to each other. CO₂ emissions are also reduced as a result of fuel being saved, while safety is increased by the connected trucks sharing information.